BREASTFEEDING

  • WITH MY SECOND ON THE WAY I WANT TO BREASTFEED THIS TIME AROUND. IAM TERRIFIED THOUGH IN SOME ASPECT I FEEL ITS UNNATURAL THOUGH I KNOW IT IS PERFECTLY NORMAL AND MORE HEALTHY FOR MY BUNDLE OF JOY. MY DAUGHTER WAS BORN AT 24 WEEKS SO I DID NOT HAVE THE CHANCE TO BREASTFEED WITH HER SHE WAS IN THE HOSPITAL FOR 7 MONTHS WITH TUBES AND SO MUCH MORE GOING ON WITH HER IT JUST WASNT POSSIBLE. I HAVE BEEN DOING A LOT OF THINKING AND TALKING TO MY HUSBAND AND DOCTOR ABOUT THE ISSUSE AND WE ALL AGREE THAT BREASTFEEDING IS BEST SO WITH THAT COMES THE CHALLENGE HOW DO I GO ABOUT THIS I NEED HELP!!!!!!! ANY SUGGESTIONS!!!!!

  • My mom breastfeed all five of her children and she'll be helping me when my baby come. I suggest you find you an experienced mother in your neighborhood to learn from.

    Make sure the baby is latched on correctly with the whole darker part of your breast in his mouth not just the nipple or it might hurt. Lessen from my mom

  • Have you tried calling the feeding expert number listed on the website. they have lactation consultants to answer questions you may have. if not, i think you just go to a hospital based breastfeeding education class.

    good luck, you can do this!!!!

  • I'm also pregnant with my second child and plan on breastfeeding again.  My first child couldn't latch on completely  so I actually pumped my milk for her the entire 7 months I was able to breastfeed. It was a lot of work but it paid off and I still felt like I was giving her the best start in life! So, my suggestion to you is read up on some techniques and tips for successful breastfeeding. You can also take a class, but I don't think there completely needed. My hospital actually has a lactation consaltant that comes and helps you as you need with breastfeeding right in your room! That was all I needed for professional help. I did have problems with latch on but we found it was my baby and not my technique. Don't worry, do a little research and you will do wonderful! There is always a way to ensure your baby gets breast milk. You just have to be willing to take that extra step!  Good luck and happy pregnancy!!

  • Just by wanting to you are headed in the right direction. I never considered breastfeeding although now I'm wondering then why was it on my registry, hmmm??? Anyway as soon as my daughter was born I felt the need to nurse her. I didn't take any classes or anything. They brung her in and the LC showed me what to do and that was the end of that and the beginning of her nursing. She showed me several different positions and my daughter was not a long nurser at all. She would nurse for 4-6 minutes and then knock out and nursed between every 2-4 hours, it's been alot of years so I can't recall the details so well but that's very accurate. My lil cousin would stay on my aunt's breast for an hour easy and they both we're equally healthy. My daughter was so fat, at 4 mos she weighed 18 pds and the nutritionist told me to stop giving her food...the nerve..She was getting strictly breast milk. I followed her pediatrician's instructions to the tee...I guess it was the new mom thing but I definitly don't believe in feeding babies anything than what is recommended. I feel they will have plenty of time to experience "adult food" and have a piece of meat or mashed potatoes so I'm not rushing mine. I'm not trying tohave any allergies started, regardless of the fact that my mom always says....when you we're a babySmileYes I know mother....Also, if you are considering purchasing/renting a breast pump check with your healthcare insurance. I just found out today mine covers the cost 100% so I will have a new Medela Dual PIS to use when I return to work or for traveling. Whichever occurs first. You'll do great, don't give up. I never experienced a problem with my milk supply or the baby latching on although I know these are some obstacles that occur for moms attempting to nurse. Best of luck and most importantly don't feel afraid to ask questions, or if you decide it's just not for you, some nursing moms can be cruel to formula moms and although I didn't give my daughter formula and nursed her for 13 months  exclusively doesn't make me or any other mom that nurses better than a mom that opts for formula.Big Smile

  • I'm a Lactation Consultant in the LA area and expecting my second baby in November. My best recommendation to you is to call the hospital where you are delivering and ask if they have a prenatal breastfeeding class. If they don't ask them to refer you to someone that does. If you're in the LA area in the Valley, call A Mother's Haven at 818-380-3111. They offer one a month and I believe the Pump Station of Santa Monica and Hollywood does too. Also, make sure as soon as you arrive at the hospital to deliver, that you tell them you are planning to be a breastfeeding mom and you would like to be seen by a LC asap after the baby is born. Most hospitals have a limited number of LCs on staff, and if you're there at a time when the floor is full you want to get on the list as quickly as possible so you're seen asap after delivery.

    The two most important classes an expecting mom can take are CPR and breastfeeding (whether she's decided she definitely wants to or not). I nursed my first for a full year. We had a rocky start because he wasn't getting a deep latch at first, but fortunately I had a friend who was a LC who came to visit us when he was only a couple of hours old and we got the issue fixed quickly. Her help is what inspired me to go back to school and get my cert so I could do the same thing. If you want, feel free to email me at kararosedragun@yahoo.com with any questions. I'm more than happy to help.

  • Thank you so much for your advice I actually feel i can do this now!!!!!!!

  • I have a silly question iam also worried about my breasts not being big enough iam a size A and have not grown any bigger at all iam so clueless how in the world will i have milk if i have no boobs? With my first child she was born at 24 weeks and they didnt grow with that one either all the other expecting moms i have spoke to told me theirs got bigger through out their nine months. I know i sound crazy and iam alittle ashamed to be telling you all this but i feel helpless and feel iam not a good mom because of this issue. I hope i havent scared you off but i could use the advice. Thanks again!!!!

  • lol Bigger is not always better. I read that its often easier with smaller breasts! You've got nipples and milk ducts. You're good! AND You never have to worry about smothering your baby like I worried. :)

  • I agree with ckaduff3...size is not an issue when it comes to the quality of milk for your baby. I too am a "modest sized woman" who grew from a B cup (on a good day) to a sort of C cup, which quickly went back to a B cup after my c-section. While my little one and I had a few extra days in the hospital, one of my nurses encouraged me to pump in order to give my daughter the colostrum she needed. "Pump what?" I thought. "There isn't anything to pump." What the nurse explained to me was that the more milk that I give to my baby (either through pumping or straight from the breast) the more my body will produce for her and I don't have to look like a Dolly Parton clone in order to have a good supply for her. 

    The other thing that I am learning is that the amount I produce is also linked to my emotional state. If I am stressed out, ticked off or in a foul mood, I do not produce nearly as much milk as when I throw on some jazz music, light a few candles and either quietly breast feed my daughter or use the breast pump. So, my 2 cents for you is to be easy with yourself and your baby. The more you worry, the less productive you will be. Be excited about bringing a healthy, happy new being in this world and trust you will give her your best...whether large or small.

    Good luck to you!

  • Honestly not all women grow during pregnancy so don't worry, and a lot of my LC clients that produce the most milk have small breasts. There is something called hypomastia where the breasts stay small, but they also are kind of tubular in appearance and very wide set apart with large nipples. Women with hypomastia sometime have trouble producing enough milk, but it's very rare. If you're concerned about it, bring it up at you next OB/midwife appointment. They'll be able to tell you for sure if your breasts are hypomastic.